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American College of Cardiology

Article Metrics

Environmental Noise and the Cardiovascular System

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 11,640)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
67 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
297 tweeters
facebook
11 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
119 Mendeley
Title
Environmental Noise and the Cardiovascular System
Published in
Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), February 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jacc.2017.12.015
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Münzel, Frank P. Schmidt, Sebastian Steven, Johannes Herzog, Andreas Daiber, Mette Sørensen

Abstract

Noise has been found associated with annoyance, stress, sleep disturbance, and impaired cognitive performance. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have found that environmental noise is associated with an increased incidence of arterial hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, and stroke. Observational and translational studies indicate that especially nighttime noise increases levels of stress hormones and vascular oxidative stress, which may lead to endothelial dysfunction and arterial hypertension. Novel experimental studies found aircraft noise to be associated with oxidative stress-induced vascular damage, mediated by activation of the NADPH oxidase, uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and vascular infiltration with inflammatory cells. Transcriptome analysis of aortic tissues from animals exposed to aircraft noise revealed changes in the expression of genes responsible for the regulation of vascular function, vascular remodeling, and cell death. This review focuses on the mechanisms and the epidemiology of noise-induced cardiovascular diseases and provides novel insight into the mechanisms underlying noise-induced vascular damage.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 297 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 119 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 18%
Student > Bachelor 21 18%
Unspecified 18 15%
Researcher 17 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 13%
Other 26 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 27 23%
Unspecified 27 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 20%
Environmental Science 12 10%
Psychology 5 4%
Other 24 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 778. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2019.
All research outputs
#6,399
of 13,234,387 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC)
#21
of 11,640 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#389
of 346,469 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC)
#1
of 353 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,234,387 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,640 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,469 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 353 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.