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American College of Cardiology

Article Metrics

Cognitive Deficits and Related Brain Lesions in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure

Overview of attention for article published in JACC: Heart Failure, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
43 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
Title
Cognitive Deficits and Related Brain Lesions in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure
Published in
JACC: Heart Failure, May 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jchf.2018.03.010
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Frey, Roxane Sell, György A. Homola, Carolin Malsch, Peter Kraft, Ignaz Gunreben, Caroline Morbach, Bálint Alkonyi, Eric Schmid, Isabella Colonna, Edith Hofer, Wolfgang Müllges, Georg Ertl, Peter Heuschmann, László Solymosi, Reinhold Schmidt, Stefan Störk, Guido Stoll

Abstract

This study sought to determine the spectrum of brain lesions seen in heart failure (HF) patients and the extent to which lesion type contributes to cognitive impairment. Cognitive deficits have been reported in patients with HF. A total of 148 systolic and diastolic HF patients (mean age 64 ± 11 years; 16% female; mean left ventricular ejection fraction 43 ± 8%) were extensively evaluated within 2 days by cardiological, neurological, and neuropsychological testing and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 288 healthy, sex- and age-matched subjects sampled from the Austrian Stroke Prevention Study served as MRI controls. Deficits in reaction times were apparent in 41% of patients and deficits in verbal memory in 46%. On brain MRI, patients showed more advanced medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) (Scheltens score) compared to controls (2.1 ± 0.9 vs. 1.0 ± 0.6; p < 0.001). The degree of MTA was strongly associated with the severity of cognitive impairment, whereas the extent of white matter hyperintensities was similar in patients and controls. Moreover, patients had a 2.7-fold increased risk for presence of clinically silent lacunes. HF patients exhibit cognitive deficits in the domains of attention and memory. MTA but not white matter lesion load seems to be related to cognitive impairment.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 31%
Student > Bachelor 2 15%
Researcher 2 15%
Unspecified 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 38%
Unspecified 3 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 15%
Chemistry 1 8%
Neuroscience 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 51. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 July 2018.
All research outputs
#286,613
of 12,406,706 outputs
Outputs from JACC: Heart Failure
#74
of 734 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,728
of 269,612 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JACC: Heart Failure
#6
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,406,706 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 734 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,612 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.