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American College of Cardiology

Article Metrics

Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Inotrope-Dependent Heart Failure Patients

Overview of attention for article published in JACC: Heart Failure, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
53 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
10 Mendeley
Title
Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Inotrope-Dependent Heart Failure Patients
Published in
JACC: Heart Failure, September 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jchf.2018.02.016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gabriel A. Hernandez, Vanessa Blumer, Luis Arcay, Jorge Monge, Juan F. Viles-Gonzalez, JoAnn Lindenfeld, Jeffrey J. Goldberger, Sandra Chaparro

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes after cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in inotrope-dependent patients with heart failure (HF) to ascertain the viability of CRT in these patients. During the last decade, significant numbers of trials have demonstrated the beneficial effect of CRT in the treatment of patients with HF and systolic dysfunction, prolonged QRS complex duration, and New York Heart Association functional class III or IV. However, it is currently undetermined whether CRT may benefit patients who require inotropic support. The authors systematically searched Medline, Embase, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library through March 2017 for studies evaluating outcomes after CRT in inotrope-dependent patients with HF. The study analyzed 8 studies including 151 patients. Most of the patients were in New York Heart Association functional class IV (80.1%), and all had severe systolic HF, with left ventricular ejection fraction less than 30% and a significant intraventricular conduction delay in their surface electrocardiogram (QRS complex duration >130 ms). The pooled analysis demonstrated that 93% of the reported patients (95% confidence interval: 86% to 100%) were weaned from inotropic support after CRT, and the overall 12-month survival rate was 69% (95% confidence interval: 56% to 83%). This study suggests that rescue CRT may be considered a viable therapeutic option in inotrope-dependent patients with HF. In these patients, rescue CRT may allow them to be weaned from inotropic therapy, improve their quality of life, and decrease the rate of mortality; furthermore, rescue CRT may serve as a possible bridge to cardiac transplantation or left ventricular assist device therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 53 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 30%
Other 2 20%
Researcher 2 20%
Student > Master 1 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 10%
Other 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 60%
Chemistry 2 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2018.
All research outputs
#408,782
of 12,378,087 outputs
Outputs from JACC: Heart Failure
#109
of 731 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,094
of 267,888 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JACC: Heart Failure
#6
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,378,087 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 731 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,888 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.