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American College of Cardiology

Article Metrics

Aspirin Does Not Increase Heart Failure Events in Heart Failure Patients

Overview of attention for article published in JACC: Heart Failure, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 670)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
18 news outlets
twitter
34 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
13 Mendeley
Title
Aspirin Does Not Increase Heart Failure Events in Heart Failure Patients
Published in
JACC: Heart Failure, August 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.jchf.2017.04.011
Pubmed ID
Authors

John R. Teerlink, Min Qian, Natalie A. Bello, Ronald S. Freudenberger, Bruce Levin, Marco R. Di Tullio, Susan Graham, Douglas L. Mann, Ralph L. Sacco, J.P. Mohr, Gregory Y.H. Lip, Arthur J. Labovitz, Seitetz C. Lee, Piotr Ponikowski, Dirk J. Lok, Stefan D. Anker, John L.P. Thompson, Shunichi Homma, WARCEF Investigators

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine whether aspirin increases heart failure (HF) hospitalization or death in patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction receiving an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB). Because of its cyclooxygenase inhibiting properties, aspirin has been postulated to increase HF events in patients treated with ACE inhibitors or ARBs. However, no large randomized trial has addressed the clinical relevance of this issue. We compared aspirin and warfarin for HF events (hospitalization, death, or both) in the 2,305 patients enrolled in the WARCEF (Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction) trial (98.6% on ACE inhibitor or ARB treatment), using conventional Cox models for time to first event (489 events). In addition, to examine multiple HF hospitalizations, we used 2 extended Cox models, a conditional model and a total time marginal model, in time to recurrent event analyses (1,078 events). After adjustment for baseline covariates, aspirin- and warfarin-treated patients did not differ in time to first HF event (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.87; 95% confidence interval: 0.72 to 1.04; p = 0.117) or first hospitalization alone (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.88; 95% confidence interval: 0.73 to 1.06; p = 0.168). The extended Cox models also found no significant differences in all HF events or in HF hospitalizations alone after adjustment for covariates. Among patients with HF with reduced ejection fraction in the WARCEF trial, there was no significant difference in risk of HF events between the aspirin and warfarin-treated patients. (Warfarin Versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction trial [WARCEF]; NCT00041938).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 31%
Professor 4 31%
Researcher 3 23%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 46%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 38%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 141. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2018.
All research outputs
#76,686
of 11,468,579 outputs
Outputs from JACC: Heart Failure
#12
of 670 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,682
of 262,930 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JACC: Heart Failure
#1
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,468,579 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 670 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,930 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.