↓ Skip to main content

American College of Cardiology

Article Metrics

Genetic Etiology for Alcohol-Induced Cardiac Toxicity

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), May 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 10,982)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
99 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
167 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
Genetic Etiology for Alcohol-Induced Cardiac Toxicity
Published in
Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), May 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.03.462
Pubmed ID
Authors

James S. Ware, Almudena Amor-Salamanca, Upasana Tayal, Risha Govind, Isabel Serrano, Joel Salazar-Mendiguchía, Jose Manuel García-Pinilla, Domingo A. Pascual-Figal, Julio Nuñez, Gonzalo Guzzo-Merello, Emiliano Gonzalez-Vioque, Alfredo Bardaji, Nicolas Manito, Miguel A. López-Garrido, Laura Padron-Barthe, Elizabeth Edwards, Nicola Whiffin, Roddy Walsh, Rachel J. Buchan, William Midwinter, Alicja Wilk, Sanjay Prasad, Antonis Pantazis, John Baski, Declan P. O’Regan, Luis Alonso-Pulpon, Stuart A. Cook, Enrique Lara-Pezzi, Paul J. Barton, Pablo Garcia-Pavia

Abstract

Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is defined by a dilated and impaired left ventricle due to chronic excess alcohol consumption. It is largely unknown which factors determine cardiac toxicity on exposure to alcohol. This study sought to evaluate the role of variation in cardiomyopathy-associated genes in the pathophysiology of ACM, and to examine the effects of alcohol intake and genotype on dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) severity. The authors characterized 141 ACM cases, 716 DCM cases, and 445 healthy volunteers. The authors compared the prevalence of rare, protein-altering variants in 9 genes associated with inherited DCM. They evaluated the effect of genotype and alcohol consumption on phenotype in DCM. Variants in well-characterized DCM-causing genes were more prevalent in patients with ACM than control subjects (13.5% vs. 2.9%; p = 1.2 ×10-5), but similar between patients with ACM and DCM (19.4%; p = 0.12) and with a predominant burden of titin truncating variants (TTNtv) (9.9%). Separately, we identified an interaction between TTN genotype and excess alcohol consumption in a cohort of DCM patients not meeting ACM criteria. On multivariate analysis, DCM patients with a TTNtv who consumed excess alcohol had an 8.7% absolute reduction in ejection fraction (95% confidence interval: -2.3% to -15.1%; p < 0.007) compared with those without TTNtv and excess alcohol consumption. The presence of TTNtv did not predict phenotype, outcome, or functional recovery on treatment in ACM patients. TTNtv represent a prevalent genetic predisposition for ACM, and are also associated with a worse left ventricular ejection fraction in DCM patients who consume alcohol above recommended levels. Familial evaluation and genetic testing should be considered in patients presenting with ACM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 167 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Professor 2 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 50%
Unspecified 9 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 12%
Psychology 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 885. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2018.
All research outputs
#4,128
of 12,363,980 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC)
#13
of 10,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#279
of 270,825 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC)
#2
of 180 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,363,980 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,982 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,825 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 180 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.