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American College of Cardiology

Article Metrics

Hemodynamic Correlates and Diagnostic Role of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

Overview of attention for article published in JACC: Heart Failure, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
109 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
Hemodynamic Correlates and Diagnostic Role of Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction
Published in
JACC: Heart Failure, May 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.jchf.2018.03.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yogesh N.V. Reddy, Thomas P. Olson, Masaru Obokata, Vojtech Melenovsky, Barry A. Borlaug

Abstract

The authors sought to define the invasive hemodynamic correlates of peak oxygen consumption (Vo2) in both supine and upright exercise in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and evaluate its diagnostic role as a method to discriminate HFpEF from noncardiac etiologies of dyspnea (NCD). Peak Vo2 is depressed in patients with HFpEF. The hemodynamic correlates of reduced peak Vo2 and its role in the clinical evaluation of HFpEF are unclear. Consecutive patients with dyspnea and normal EF (N = 206) undergoing both noninvasive upright and invasive supine cardiopulmonary exercise testing were examined. Patients with invasively verified HFpEF were compared with those with NCD. Compared with NCD (n = 72), HFpEF patients (n = 134) displayed lower peak Vo2 during upright and supine exercise. Left heart filling pressures during exercise were inversely correlated with peak Vo2 in HFpEF, even after accounting for known determinants of O2 transport according to the Fick principle. Very low upright peak Vo2 (<14 ml/kg/min) discriminated HFpEF from NCD with excellent specificity (91%) but poor sensitivity (50%). Preserved peak Vo2 (>20 ml/kg/min) excluded HFpEF with high sensitivity (90%) but had poor specificity (49%). Intermediate peak Vo2 cutoff points were associated with substantial overlap between cases and NCD. Elevated cardiac filling pressure during exercise is independently correlated with reduced exercise capacity in HFpEF, irrespective of body position, emphasizing its importance as a novel therapeutic target. Noninvasive cardiopulmonary testing discriminates HFpEF and NCD at high and low values, but additional testing is required for patients with intermediate peak Vo2.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 109 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 27%
Researcher 4 15%
Unspecified 4 15%
Other 3 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 62%
Unspecified 9 35%
Neuroscience 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 65. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2018.
All research outputs
#220,380
of 12,372,610 outputs
Outputs from JACC: Heart Failure
#54
of 732 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,047
of 273,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JACC: Heart Failure
#6
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,610 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 732 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,060 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.